Month: May 2018

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The Kīlauea volcano in Hawaii began causing earthquakes on Wednesday afternoon, after morning explosions of “ballistic blocks” three times larger than bowling balls. Earthquakes up to 4.4 magnitude have been measured after Kilauea’s caldera, one of its large craters, dropped 90cm causing nearby faults to move.   According to the US Geological Survey (USGS), residents
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If you thought the crisis over the gaping hole in the ozone layer was under control, prepare to be disappointed. Researchers at the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) have noticed an unexpected and persistent increase in ozone-destroying chemicals, called chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs).   The Montreal Protocol, which was finalised in 1987, was a revolutionary, international
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SpaceX successfully launched Bangladesh’s first-ever geostationary communications satellite, called Bangabandhu-1, into space on Friday. But the real star of the mission was a newly designed rocket called Falcon 9 Block 5. Elon Musk, the founder of SpaceX, said the launcher is built to be the most powerful, reusable, and affordable version of his company’s workhorse
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When you hear the term “introvert,” you might imagine someone who’s quiet and insular, who likes to spend most of their time alone, avoiding social situations. But being an introvert isn’t really anything to do with how much you like spending time with other people. In fact, introverts can have some of the deepest and
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There’s no easy way to rate dog intelligence. It can be focused on more than one thing. As canine psychologist Stanley Coren wrote back in the ’90s, there’s adaptive intelligence (i.e., figuring stuff out), working intelligence (i.e. following orders), and instinctive intelligence (i.e. innate talent) – not to mention spatial intelligence, kinesthetic intelligence, interpersonal intelligence,
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Juno has been sending home some incredible postcards of Jupiter, with one slightly frustrating caveat: because of the data transfer limitations, they are, by necessity, still pictures. Now an amateur scientist has used those photographs to extrapolate an animation of Jupiter’s clouds, and the results are just jaw-dropping.   Gerald Eichstädt is a member of the Planetary