NASA

Every element of NASA’s Orion spacecraft, Space Launch System rocket, and ground systems is now at Kennedy Space Center — the final stop on planet Earth before the uncrewed Artemis I mission around the Moon. These critical components are being primed for flight through final assembly, stacking, and fueling operations. The first in a series
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In this artist’s rendition, we explore a metallic world named Psyche, an asteroid that offers a unique window into the building blocks of planet formation. The NASA Psyche mission launches in 2022 and will arrive at the asteroid Psyche, which orbits the Sun between Mars and Jupiter, in 2026. The spacecraft, also named Psyche, will
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The astronauts aboard the International Space Station are ready for a big delivery of science experiments and supplies! From seeds to a robotic arm, NASA astronauts Megan McArthur and Shane Kimbrough discuss the investigations they are excited to welcome aboard station during SpaceX’s 23nd commercial resupply mission. The SpaceX CRS-23 mission is scheduled to arrive
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The Artemis missions will build a community on the Moon, driving a new lunar economy and inspiring a new generation. Narrator Drew Barrymore and NASA team members explain why returning to the Moon is the natural next step in human exploration, and how the lessons learned from Artemis will pave the way to Mars and
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NASA’s Orion spacecraft is built to take humans farther than they’ve ever gone before. Orion will serve as the exploration vehicle that will carry the crew to space, provide emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during the space travel, and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. On December 4, 2014, Orion will launch
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There’s a huge amount of variety among exoplanets – planets outside our solar system. There are water worlds, lava planets, egg-shaped worlds, planets with multiple suns, and even planets with no sun at all! What can we learn from all this weird, wondrous variety? What does it tell us about both the exoplanets themselves and
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NASA is targeting the final test in the Green Run series, the hot fire, for Sat., Jan.16. The hot fire is the culmination of the Green Run test series, an eight-part test campaign that gradually brings the core stage of the Space Launch System (SLS) — the deep space rocket that will power the Artemis
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We’re going back to Mars! Our newest rover is named Perseverance, and will be launching soon for its seven-month journey to the Red Planet to search for signs of ancient life. And it’s bringing along a friend: a little helicopter named Ingenuity! Ingenuity will test the first powered flight on Mars. Join us in wishing
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Making progress on our Artemis Moon rocket, images from a close encounter with a Jovian moon, and a ring of fire for our Moon … a few of the stories to tell you about – This Week at NASA! Download Link: https://images.nasa.gov/details-Making%20Progress%20on%20Our%20Artemis%20Moon%20Rocket%20on%20This%20Week%20@NASA%20%E2%80%93%20June%2011,%202021 Video Credits Producer/Writer: Andre Valentine Editor: Amy Leniart
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Venus, our planetary neighbor, is a hot, hellish unforgiving world and NASA has selected two bold new missions to study this inferno-like planet: DAVINCI+ and VERITAS. Are Venus and Earth fundamentally unique worlds? Or are the differences between these ‘twins’ only cosmetic? Answering this question is key to understanding what makes other rocky planets habitable
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NASA astronaut Randy Bresnik captured this footage with a GoPro camera on Oct. 20, 2017 during a spacewalk outside the International Space Station. Bresnik reflected on this quiet moment, “Sometimes on a #spacewalk, you just have to take a moment to enjoy the beauty of our planet Earth. This Go-Pro footage is from our spacewalk
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How are stars and planets born? What happens to its planets when a star dies? At our Exoplanets website, come along on an epic interstellar journey, billions of years long, through the life and death of a planetary system: https://exoplanets.nasa.gov/life-and-death/intro/
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NASA’s Parker Solar Probe is heading to the Sun.Thermal Protection System Engineer Betsy Congdon (Johns Hopkins APL) outlines why Parker can take the heat. More: https://go.nasa.gov/2O7YKsK | NASA launch schedule: https://go.nasa.gov/2JfklMB Music credit: Cheeky Chappy [Main Track] by Jimmy Kaleth, Ross Andrew McLean Credit: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center Genna Duberstein (USRA): Lead Producer/Lead Editor
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There’s a helpful concept we use to help understand what distance from a given star you might expect to find planets with liquid water on their surface – liquid water being essential for life as we know it. It’s called the habitable zone. Every star has a habitable zone, but where that zone lies is
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“It’s all about exploration” Born in Honolulu, Hawaii, NASA Astronaut Megan McArthur is currently assigned as Pilot of the NASA SpaceX Crew-2 mission to the International Space Station. Her previous spaceflight experience includes STS-125 for the servicing of the Hubble Space Telescope. McArthur worked as the flight engineer and robotic arm operator. She carefully retrieved
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“I like new experiences. I like to learn all the time.” Born in Rouen, France, Thomas Pesquet is a European Space Agency Astronaut and is assigned as a Crew-2 Mission Specialist. Thomas was selected as an ESA astronaut in May 2009. In 2016, he launched to the International Space Station for his six-month Proxima mission,
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“I have dreamt of becoming an astronaut since my childhood.” Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Akihiko Hoshide was born on December 28th, 1968 in Tokyo, Japan. He received a bachelor’s degree in Mechanical Engineering from Keio University in 1992, and a Master of Science in Aerospace Engineering from the University of Houston, Cullen College of
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We are all connected to and by Earth — whether it’s the trees and plants that give us the oxygen we breathe, the snow-capped mountains that provide the water we drink, or the breathtaking geophysical forces that shape the land beneath our feet. NASA has over 20 satellites measuring the height of oceans and inland
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Exoplanets – planets outside our solar system – are everywhere. But why do we study them? What makes them so interesting? At NASA, we’re surveying and studying exoplanets to learn all about their weirdness, their variety, and all the fascinating things they can tell us about how planets form and develop. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
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We’re doing science at 17,500 miles per hour! The International Space Station is a state-of-the-art microgravity laboratory that is unlocking discoveries not possible on Earth, and helping us push farther into deep space. We’re testing technologies that are critical to our return to the Moon and great leap to Mars. Station research has contributed to
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When we describe different types of exoplanets – planets outside our solar system – what do we mean by “hot Jupiters,” “warm Neptunes,” and “super-Earths”? Since we’re still surveying and learning about the variety of worlds out there among the stars, it’s sometimes helpful to refer to characteristics they share with planets we’re familiar with
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Artemis 1 will be the first integrated test of NASA’s deep space exploration systems: the Orion spacecraft, Space Launch System (SLS) rocket and the ground systems at Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida. The first in a series of increasingly complex missions, Artemis I will be an uncrewed flight test that will provide a
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NASA astronaut Jessica Meir is a member of the Artemis Team, a select group of astronauts charged with focusing on the development and training efforts for early Artemis missions. Through the Artemis program NASA and a coalition of international partners will return to the Moon to learn how to live on other worlds for the
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Preparing a small satellite to conduct some big science, an update on our upcoming mission to a metal-rich asteroid, and a new director for the International Space Station … a few of the stories to tell you about – This Week at NASA! Download Link: https://images.nasa.gov/details-NHQ_2021_0402_TW@N_GENERAL%20USE Producer: Andre Valentine Editor: Lacey Young Music: Universal Production
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Legendary NASA Flight Director Glynn Lunney, 84, died Friday, March 19. Lunney was a flight director for the Apollo 11 Moon landing mission, and was lead flight director for Apollo 7, the first crewed Apollo flight, and Apollo 10, the dress rehearsal for the first Moon landing, in NASA’s Mission Control Center in Houston. He
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NASA astronaut Raja Chari is a member of the Artemis Team, a select group of astronauts charged with focusing on the development and training efforts for early Artemis missions. Through the Artemis program NASA and a coalition of international partners will return to the Moon to learn how to live on other worlds for the
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You’ve heard of asteroids… But have you heard of Trojan asteroids? Our upcoming Lucy mission will study these time capsules from the birth of our solar system for the first time ever. Find out what you need to know about Trojan Asteroids. For more information about Lucy, check out this episode of NASA Science Live:
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Perseverance sends more sounds from Mars, the rocket boosters for Artemis I are all stacked up, and preview of a weekend spacewalk … a few of the stories to tell you about – This Week at NASA! https://images.nasa.gov/details-Perseverance%20Sends%20More%20Sounds%20From%20Mars%20on%20This%20Week%20@NASA%20%E2%80%93%20March%2012,%202021 Producer: Andre Valentine Editor: Lacey Young Music: Universal Production Music
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Deep space exploration begins on American factory floors. The launch of Artemis I will bring together the world’s most powerful rocket, NASA’s Space Launch System and the Orion Spacecraft, to prepare us to land the first woman and the next man on the lunar surface.
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When NASA’s InSight descends to the Red Planet on Nov. 26, 2018, it’s guaranteed to be a white-knuckle event. Rob Manning, chief engineer at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, explains the critical steps that must happen in perfect sequence to get the robotic lander safely to the surface. Download this video: https://images.nasa.gov/details-JPL-20181031-INSIGHf-0001-InSight%20Landing%20on%20Mars.html
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NASA’s next Mars rover has a new name: Perseverance. After sorting through more than 28,000 submissions from K-12 students from every U.S. state and territory, one name was chosen. Alexander Mather, a 13-year-old student from Virginia who submitted the winning name, explains why he chose Perseverance as the name of NASA’s next robotic scientist to
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Our Perseverance rover takes up residence on Mars, the space station’s next commercial resupply mission, and a new date for a commercial crew test flight … a few of the stories to tell you about – This Week at NASA! Download Link: https://images.nasa.gov/details-Our%20Perseverance%20Rover%20Takes%20up%20Residence%20on%20Mars%20on%20This%20Week%20@NASA%20%E2%80%93%20February%2020,%202021
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Watch live on February 18, 2021, as our Perseverance Mars Rover touches down on the Red Planet. 60 years ago, NASA started sending robotic explorers to Mars, but none have been as sophisticated as Perseverance. It will gather samples from the Martian surface for possible later return to Earth, and fly a drone for the
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NASA Television shares this inspiring production by Italian videomaker, Giacomo Sardelli, about the International Space Station, its inhabitants, and its role in space exploration. Sardelli writes of the video, “I’m not the first one to use NASA’s pictures taken from the International Space Station to craft a Timelapse video. You can find many of them
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Apollo 14 was the eighth crewed Apollo mission and the third to land on the Moon. On January 31, 1971, Apollo 14 launched from Kennedy Space Center with a crew of commander Alan B. Shepard, command module pilot Stuart A. Roosa, and lunar module pilot Edgar D. Mitchell. The crew experienced challenges in docking with
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