Nature

NEWS 29 July 2021 A blood marker predicts who gets ‘breakthrough’ COVID Real-world evidence from a medical centre links high levels of potent antibodies after vaccination to a reduced risk of infection. Smriti Mallapaty 0 Smriti Mallapaty Smriti Mallapaty is a senior reporter in Sydney, Australia. View author publications You can also search for this
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A vehicle roughly 10 micrometres long can trace a circular path under the command of polarized light. Credit: D. Andrén et al./Nature Nanotechnol. Materials science 28 July 2021 Mini ‘metavehicles’ zip and swerve on light power Light can be used to both propel and steer tiny vehicles made with materials that have distinctive optical properties.
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Utah’s governor has encouraged residents to pray for rain for over two months. Gov. Spencer Cox, who has declared two drought emergencies in the last three months and encouraged residents to help save water, has invited residents to use the first weekend of June to pray for “divine intervention,” regardless of religious affiliation. “We may be
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A bumblebee visiting a robotic flower receives a drop of sugar water as a reward. Credit: Jan-Hendrik Dudenhöffer Animal behaviour 28 July 2021 A caffeine buzz gives bees flower power Bumblebees dosed with caffeine can more easily remember the scent of sugar-heavy blossoms. Share on Twitter Share on Twitter Share on Facebook Share on Facebook
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NATURE PODCAST 28 July 2021 Has the world’s oldest known animal been discovered? Researchers debate whether an ancient fossil is the oldest animal yet discovered, and a new way to eavesdrop on glaciers. Benjamin Thompson & Noah Baker Benjamin Thompson View author publications You can also search for this author in PubMed  Google Scholar Noah
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CAREER COLUMN 28 July 2021 How to get media coverage and boost your science’s impact A good communications strategy can get your research seen by decision makers, says Rebecca Fuoco. Rebecca Fuoco 0 Rebecca Fuoco Rebecca Fuoco leads communications at the Green Science Policy Institute in Berkeley, California. View author publications You can also search
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CORRESPONDENCE 27 July 2021 Global climate models do not need more behavioural science M. Granger Morgan 0 & Hadi Dowlatabadi 1 M. Granger Morgan Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, USA. View author publications You can also search for this author in PubMed  Google Scholar Hadi Dowlatabadi University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. View author publications You
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Download PDF My group wants to understand the components of lung surfactants — complex substances that keep our air sacs from collapsing. Bioengineers would like to make synthetic surfactants to treat lung disease, but we must understand the real ones first. As a computational chemist, I use computer simulations to understand the molecular dynamics of
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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (C.D.C.) discovered multiple instances of Candida Auris that were resistant to all medicines in two health institutions in Texas and a long-term care facility in Washington, D.C. for the first time. According to researchers, a deadly, difficult-to-treat fungal infection spreading through nursing homes and hospitals across the United
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NATURE PODCAST 24 July 2021 Coronapod: the latest on COVID and sporting events As the Olympics kick off, data on the impact of large sporting events is still limited, despite large research efforts Noah Baker & Holly Else Noah Baker View author publications You can also search for this author in PubMed  Google Scholar Holly
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Despite spending almost the same amount of money on products, men’s purchasing produces 16 percent more climate-warming emissions than women’s, according to research. (Photo : Getty Images) The most significant difference was in men’s spending on gasoline and diesel for their automobiles. According to the researchers, gender variations in emissions have been poorly researched and
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The Ganges River is one of the biggest contributors of mercury into coastal oceans. Credit: ESA/Shutterstock Geochemistry 23 July 2021 Toxic mercury rides rivers into the sea Research suggests that rivers are a bigger source of mercury in coastal waters than is the atmosphere — a finding that contradicts some global models. Share on Twitter
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NEWS 23 July 2021 NASA investigates renaming James Webb telescope after anti-LGBT+ claims Some astronomers argue the flagship observatory — successor to the Hubble Space Telescope — will memorialize discrimination. Others are waiting for more evidence. Alexandra Witze Alexandra Witze View author publications You can also search for this author in PubMed  Google Scholar Share
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A sulphur-crested cockatoo grabs a snack by walking along the edge of a rubbish bin to open the lid. Credit: Barbara Klump/Max Planck Institute of Animal Behavior Animal behaviour 22 July 2021 Rubbish-raiding parrots take lessons from co-conspirators Sulphur-crested cockatoos are the first parrots known to have complex culture centred on food-gathering. Share on Twitter
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NATURE PODCAST 21 July 2021 How the US is rebooting gun violence research Funding for gun violence research in the US returns after a 20-year federal hiatus, and the glass sponges that can manipulate ocean currents. Shamini Bundell & Benjamin Thompson Shamini Bundell View author publications You can also search for this author in PubMed
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Domesticated cannabis in Qinghai province, China. Credit: Guangpeng Ren Genomics 21 July 2021 The surprising place where pot farming first blossomed Humans first began cultivating cannabis, a source of both fibres and drugs, some 12,000 years ago. Share on Twitter Share on Twitter Share on Facebook Share on Facebook Share via E-Mail Share via E-Mail
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According to a new technique of analyzing satellite data of Earth’s cloud cover, clouds are highly likely to exacerbate global warming. (Photo : Christopher Burns) Scientists from Imperial College London and the University of East Anglia conducted the study, which provides the best evidence that clouds would increase global warming over time, aggravating climate change.
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CORRESPONDENCE 20 July 2021 Six years as university rector changed how I do genetics Giuseppe Novelli  ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-7781-602X 0 Giuseppe Novelli University of Rome Tor Vergata, Italy. View author publications You can also search for this author in PubMed  Google Scholar Share on Twitter Share on Twitter Share on Facebook Share on Facebook Share via
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Plateau pikas ‘kiss’ during the growing season, when their metabolic rates are much higher than during the winter. Credit: Zhou Jinshuai/Xinhua/Alamy Zoology 19 July 2021 Pikas in high places have a winter-time treat: yak poo Snacks of faeces help the pocket-sized mammals survive the cold and wind atop a vast plateau that abuts the Himalayas.
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