Nature

Plateau pikas ‘kiss’ during the growing season, when their metabolic rates are much higher than during the winter. Credit: Zhou Jinshuai/Xinhua/Alamy Zoology 19 July 2021 Pikas in high places have a winter-time treat: yak poo Snacks of faeces help the pocket-sized mammals survive the cold and wind atop a vast plateau that abuts the Himalayas.
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Blazing wildfires continue to wreak havoc in northern California, prompting evacuation orders, highway closures, and event cancellations – while the potential of “dry lightning” has prompted red flag warnings across the state for Sunday. (Photo : Getty Images) Red Flag Warnings A red flag warning has been issued for the Northern Rockies, which are now experiencing
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NEWS 16 July 2021 The vanishing neutrinos that could upend fundamental physics The search for exotic ‘Majorana’ particles that could solve a big antimatter mystery is ramping up around the world. Davide Castelvecchi Davide Castelvecchi View author publications You can also search for this author in PubMed  Google Scholar Share on Twitter Share on Twitter
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NEWS 16 July 2021 Astronomers push for global debate on giant satellite swarms Working with the United Nations, scientists hope to establish standards for satellite ‘megaconstellations’ and reduce disruption of astronomical observations. Alexandra Witze Alexandra Witze View author publications You can also search for this author in PubMed  Google Scholar Share on Twitter Share on
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NEWS 16 July 2021 Massive DNA ‘Borg’ structures perplex scientists Researchers say they have discovered unique and exciting DNA strands in the mud — others aren’t sure of their novelty. Amber Dance 0 Amber Dance Amber Dance is a science journalist in Los Angeles, California. View author publications You can also search for this author
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BOOK REVIEW 16 July 2021 Cooperation’s pros and cons, construction decarbonized, and into the wild: Books in brief Andrew Robinson reviews five of the week’s best science picks. Andrew Robinson 0 Andrew Robinson Andrew Robinson’s many books include Lost Languages: The Enigma of the World’s Undeciphered Scripts and Einstein on the Run: How Britain Saved
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Sharks are an assorted group of fish that have been lurking in our oceans for hundreds of millions of years. The group comprises several enormous, food chain-topping animal preys from the defunct Helicoprion, whose jaw is like a circular saw, to today’s great white sharks that move through water like a bullet as they hunt
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OUTLOOK 14 July 2021 Autoimmune disease When the body becomes the target of its own defensive arsenal, medicine must step in. Richard Hodson 0 Richard Hodson Senior supplements editor. View author publications You can also search for this author in PubMed  Google Scholar Share on Twitter Share on Twitter Share on Facebook Share on Facebook
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NEWS ROUND-UP 14 July 2021 Mars auroras, deadly heatwave and new ERC president The latest science news, in brief. Share on Twitter Share on Twitter Share on Facebook Share on Facebook Share via E-Mail Share via E-Mail Download PDF Images taken by Hope’s onboard spectrometer (left-hand panel) and an artist’s impression (right) show discrete auroras
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Download PDF The scriptwriter for the next President of Earth pondered the choice between ‘outrage’ and ‘oppression’. Like any modern android, LNR6072431 — Eleanor for short — was constructed from biosynth and neuromimetics, as close to a genuine human as Lyncon-Nixxon Robotics could get. Yet most people still found androids creepy, thanks to some genetic
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A Psammodromus algirus lizard in Spain, where wildfires can confer long-lasting relief from parasites. Credit: Philippe Clement/Nature Picture Library Ecology 13 July 2021 Destructive fires serve as pest control for lizards Mediterranean lizards in burnt areas are less likely to be afflicted by mites than their neighbours in unburnt woodlands. Share on Twitter Share on
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CORRESPONDENCE 13 July 2021 Italy: Forest harvesting is the opposite of green growth Roberto Cazzolla Gatti 0 , Gianluca Piovesan 1 & Alessandro Chiarucci 2 Roberto Cazzolla Gatti Tomsk State University, Russia. View author publications You can also search for this author in PubMed  Google Scholar Gianluca Piovesan University of Tuscia, Viterbo, Italy. View author
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Robbins Island off north-west Tasmania plans to build a windfarm that could threaten the disease-free Tasmanian devil population according to federal environment officials. The planned windfarm worried environmental officials about the potential damage it could impose to the Tasmanian Devils and their survival. According to Guardian Australia, the threat this could bring can be serious
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CORRESPONDENCE 13 July 2021 To build resilience, study complex systems Len Fisher 0 Len Fisher University of Bristol, UK. View author publications You can also search for this author in PubMed  Google Scholar Share on Twitter Share on Twitter Share on Facebook Share on Facebook Share via E-Mail Share via E-Mail Download PDF Research has
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Although black holes (left, surrounded by a disc of hot gas; artist’s impression) often consume matter from stars, their gravity can also fling stars outwards. Credit: ESA, NASA and Felix Mirabel Astronomy and astrophysics 12 July 2021 A swarm of black holes could explain Galactic fluffiness Diffuse Milky Way formation might have been depleted by
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Download PDF Thirty-five years after the explosion and meltdown at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine, I study how amphibians in the region have changed, physically and genetically. In 2016, I joined an international research team to do this; since then, I have obtained various grants to continue the work. Chernobyl is a phenomenal
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Fossil remains of two newly described palaeotheriidae mammals inhabiting the subtropical landscape of Basque region were found to be relatives of horses that trotted the Earth 37 million years ago. The previously unknown mammals are called paleotheres or ‘pseudo-horses’ that lived in the archipelago of Europe when the climate was much warmer, according to the
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Authorities announced that this animal is no longer endangered but has been reclassified as a susceptible specie with a population outside captivity of 1,800.  (Photo : Getty Images) Relentless Conservation Efforts After years of conservation efforts, Chinese officials said Giant pandas are not endangered in the wild any longer, but they are still susceptible with
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NATURE PODCAST 09 July 2021 Coronapod: kids’ role in the future of COVID As vaccines start to protect older generations, might COVID become a disease of the young? Noah Baker & Smriti Mallapaty 1 Noah Baker View author publications You can also search for this author in PubMed  Google Scholar Smriti Mallapaty Smriti Mallapaty is
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An ice-breaker navigates Canada’s Arctic waters, which could soon become accessible to ordinary vessels if global temperatures continue to climb. Credit: Canadian Press/Shutterstock Ocean sciences 09 July 2021 Cruise ships could sail now-icy Arctic seas by century’s end Without carbon cuts, many cargo ships could ply the Northwest Passage, between the Atlantic and Pacific oceans,
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