Nature

Credit: Jonas Bergstrand The competition to be crowned the fastest, strongest or most technically proficient sportsperson on the planet will once again reach its peak this summer when athletes descend on Tokyo for the Olympic Games. The global pandemic might rule out the throng of enthusiastic spectators that are typical of such an event, but
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Researchers from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) have developed a “smart” device that harvests daylight and relays it to underground spaces, reducing the need for traditional energy sources. (Photo : American Public Power Association on Unsplash) Authorities in Singapore consider whether it is feasible to dig deeper underground to create new space for infrastructure,
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Food and surfaces are sampled for traces of the virus at a wet market in China.Credit: Wei Liang/China News Service via Getty Researchers say that a World Health Organization (WHO) report on the pandemic’s origins offers an in-depth summary of available data, including unseen granular details. But much remains to be done to establish the
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Listen to the latest science news, with Benjamin Thompson and Nick Petrić Howe. Your browser does not support the audio element. Download MP3 In this episode: 00:44 Cooling antimatter with a laser focus Antimatter is annihilated whenever it interacts with regular matter, which makes it tough for physicists to investigate. Now though, a team at
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The Australian Academy of Science said that heatwaves will be twice as much and several properties will be uninsurable if global heating reaches 3C (Photo : Getty Images) Global Warming According to Australia’s leading researchers, Global heating of 3C would be more than twice the number of yearly heatwaves in some parts of Australia, leave
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The Biden administration’s climate envoy John Kerry has reiterated US commitment to net-zero emissions by 2050, but not yet specified which substances will be included in its pledge.Credit: Stefani Reynolds/Bloomberg/Getty The administration of US President Joe Biden has pledged 2050 as its deadline for net-zero greenhouse-gas emissions. Earlier, China declared 2060 for its own net-zero
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Visitors look at a scale model of the Thirty Meter Telescope at India’s Visvesvaraya Industrial and Technological Museum in Bangalore.Credit: Manjunath Kiran/AFP via Getty We are heartened to see a chapter on public engagement in science and technology in India’s draft Science, Technology, and Innovation Policy 2020 (see go.nature.com/3k7g6hf). We sincerely hope there is the
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My work focuses on a side of Ireland that few visitors ever see: the temperate rainforest of Killarney National Park, a 10,200-hectare reserve near the southwest coast. The climate here — usually damp and, by Irish standards, relatively warm, with temperatures in autumn afternoons typically edging beyond 10 °C — creates ideal growing conditions for all
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A farmer in Ethiopia harvests teff, a cereal. Small farms tend to have more-diverse landscapes than do sprawling industrial operations. Credit: Andia/Universal Images Group/Getty Environmental sciences 29 March 2021 Small farms outdo big ones on biodiversity — and crop yields Large-scale farms account for most of the global food supply, but smallholdings protect species and
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Back when marsupial lions, mega wombats, and sheep-sized echidnas walked the ancient lands of Australia, there lived also an enormous flightless bird called the ‘demon duck of doom’ by some, paleontologist Trevor Worthy describes the Dromornis stirtoni as an “extreme evolutionary experiment.” “It would seem these large birds were likely what evolution created when it
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Former Peruvian president Martín Vizcarra was the first prominent person identified by local media to have received a COVID-19 vaccine in violation of clinical-trial standards.Credit: Ernesto Benavides/AFP/Getty A clinical trial of COVID-19 vaccines in Peru has sparked outrage and triggered a series of high-profile resignations at universities and in government. Politicians, researchers and some of
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According to a recent study from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) understates methane emissions from oil and gas extraction in its annual Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Sinks. The study team discovered 90 percent higher oil production emissions and 50 percent higher
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Subjected to pressures found 4 kilometres below the ocean surface, bacteria fare better (bottom) when fed the compound trimethylamine than bacteria that go without (top). Credit: Q. L. Qin et al./Sci. Adv. Microbiology 26 March 2021 How deep-sea bacteria thrive under pressure Microbes that survive in the dark depths import and process a molecule in
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The light of young galaxies has given astronomers a glimpse of some of the interwoven tendrils of gas (illustration) filling the Universe. Credit: NASA/ESA/STScI/Science Photo Library Astronomy and astrophysics 26 March 2021 Faint galaxies light up the dark web filling the cosmos Dim, distant collections of stars hint at the early evolution of the Universe.
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Researchers are mapping the strange “lost” continent of Zealandia for the first time. The huge landmass in the South Pacific vanished 23 million years ago under the waves – and has never been investigated. It was initially part of the huge Gondwana (supercontinent), which was created by continents that are present in the southern hemisphere.
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According to a new study published today in the journal Science, applying California’s strict diesel pollution requirements to the rest of the country could significantly boost the nation’s air quality and health, especially in low-income communities of color. California Diesel Emission Policy (Photo : Getty images )An aerial view shows MacArthur Park and downtown in
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Storm clouds that spawn lightning are becoming more common in the warming Arctic, where such light shows have been rare. Credit: Ivan Kmit/Alamy Atmospheric science 25 March 2021 Rising temperatures spark boom in Arctic lightning Warming in the frozen north leads to more clouds that can produce electrical discharge. Share on Twitter Share on Twitter
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1. Luyssaert, S. et al. Old-growth forests as global carbon sinks. Nature 455, 213–215 (2008). ADS  CAS  Article  Google Scholar  2. Odum, E. P. The strategy of ecosystem development. Science 164, 262–270 (1969). ADS  CAS  Article  Google Scholar  3. Pan, Y. D. et al. A large and persistent carbon sink in the world’s forests. Science
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László Lovász (left) and Avi Wigderson were jointly awarded the 2021 Abel Prize.Credits: left, Hungarian Academy of Sciences/Laszlo Mudra/AbelPrize; right, Cliff Moore/Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton/AbelPrize Abel prize celebrates union of maths and computer science Two pioneers of the theory of computation have won the 2021 Abel Prize, one of the most prestigious honours in
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A pair of researchers from the University of Lausanne has discovered a connection between invasive animal species and global pet trade commercial success. Jérôme Gippet and Cleo Bertelsmeier explained their analysis of invasive species sales and what they discovered in a paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (Photo : Photo by
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From all indicators, the electric car is finally coming into its own. A long-standing part of science fiction’s visions of the future, the electric car has been a reality for awhile now — and its popularity seems poised to grow considerably in the coming years. In fact, while gas cars may never entirely become extinct,
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Astronomer Vera Rubin studying photographic plates in 1974.Credit: Carnegie Institution for Science Vera Rubin: A Life Jacqueline Mitton & Simon Mitton Belknap Press (2021) The Vera C. Rubin Observatory, under construction in Chile, is scheduled to begin scientific operations in 2023. Its ten-year Legacy Survey of Space and Time hopes to “see more of the
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In this photo, taken in December 2020, I am reviewing students’ progress in a computer networking course at Makerere University in Kampala, Uganda, where I teach electrical engineering and telecommunication policy. The students are learning to configure computers to accommodate Voice over Internet Protocol, or online telephony. We’ve also explored the programming language Python, and
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Bacterium is accountable for the extinction of critically endangered species. With wild populations wiped out, Christmas Island chained gecko or Lister’s gecko (Lepidodactylus listeri) and the blue-tailed skink only survive in captivity. Researchers from the University of Sydney have found a bacterium, which could potentially cause their extinction. (Photo : Getty Images) Christmas Island Chained
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