Nature

NEWS 20 August 2021 Home seismometers provide crucial data on Haiti’s quake A volunteer network helps to monitor aftershocks and illuminate the country’s earthquake hazards. Alexandra Witze Alexandra Witze View author publications You can also search for this author in PubMed  Google Scholar Share on Twitter Share on Twitter Share on Facebook Share on Facebook
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Download PDF There’s only so much flying a man can do, even if you’re not a man any longer. Sure, you have the power, and have drunk up all the fuel your boots’ propulsion systems could burn, pushing you forever onward to the next habitable world. Sure, you have a crock-pot-sized fusion reactor juicing your
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NEWS 20 August 2021 The mutation that helps Delta spread like wildfire A key amino-acid change might underlie the coronavirus variant’s ferocious infectivity. Ewen Callaway Ewen Callaway View author publications You can also search for this author in PubMed  Google Scholar Share on Twitter Share on Twitter Share on Facebook Share on Facebook Share via
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The summit of Greenland’s ice sheet has just experienced rainfall for the first time in recorded history, in yet another disturbing milestone in our ecological unravelling. Like most parts of the Northern Hemisphere, Greenland has been experiencing an intense heatwave with temperatures at the summit of the glacier increasing above freezing for the third time
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Appalachian Botanical Company is converting portions of a depleted strip mine in Boone County, West Virginia, into a fragrant utopia of  lavender flowers and swarming honey bees. Former strip mines aren’t the first location that springs to mind when it comes to sustainable agriculture, beekeeping, or the wellness sector. However, an initiative in southeastern West
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NEWS 19 August 2021 Baby bats babble like human infants Repeated vocalizations could help young bats to practise the sounds they will need as adults. Max Kozlov Max Kozlov View author publications You can also search for this author in PubMed  Google Scholar Share on Twitter Share on Twitter Share on Facebook Share on Facebook
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The only remaining mountaintop glacier in Sweden, which was also its highest peak until 2019, is reduced by another two metres in height in the past year because of increasing air temperatures which climate change drove, Stockholm University says. Researchers disclose that climate change is causing the melting, and this has seen the highest mountain in Sweden
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This soft prosthetic hand allows the wearer to grasp delicate objects such as cakes and berries. Credit: G. Gu et al./Nature Biomed. Eng. Engineering 18 August 2021 A tough prosthetic hand obeys the muscles’ commands The inexpensive and lightweight prosthesis also provides feedback akin to a sense of touch. Share on Twitter Share on Twitter
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A Sumatran orangutan named Padana raps nuts with a log ‘hammer’ atop a tree stump ‘anvil’, a technique she invented herself. Credit: Claudio Tennie Animal behaviour 18 August 2021 Clever orangutans invent nutcrackers from scratch Chimpanzees are not the only great apes to develop tools without tutoring. Share on Twitter Share on Twitter Share on
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According to the most extensive evaluation of climate research to date, water issues – drought, with its attendant wildfires and flooding – are expected to grow considerably worse throughout the planet as climate crisis intensifies. (Photo : Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images) IPCC Report The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change says global warming of at
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Rice planting in China releases the potent greenhouse gas methane. Those emissions contribute to making rice grown in China a generally less climate-friendly crop per calorie than potato. Credit: Costfoto/Barcroft Media/Getty Sustainability 18 August 2021 Can Chinese diners embrace potatoes? The answer could affect Earth’s climate A switch to spuds in a country where rice
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People gather at a pump in India to collect groundwater. Accessible, fresh water makes up only a fraction of the water in Earth’s crust. Credit: Jack Laurenson/Lnp/Shutterstock Water resources 17 August 2021 A staggering store of water is revealed in Earth’s crust Modelling work shows that crustal groundwater accounts for more water than the world’s
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CORRESPONDENCE 17 August 2021 Bespoke open databases would be cheaper and easier to analyse Nikolaus Obwegeser  ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0003-3404-1989 0 , Henrik M. Rønnow  ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-8832-8865 1 & Tomoko Yokoi  ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-6671-2946 2 Nikolaus Obwegeser Bern University of Applied Sciences, Bern, Switzerland View author publications You can also search for this author in PubMed  Google Scholar
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NEWS AND VIEWS 16 August 2021 ‘Polluter pays’ policy could speed up emission reductions and removal of atmospheric CO2 To meet climate targets, technologies that remove atmospheric carbon dioxide will probably be needed. An analysis shows how their development and use could be accelerated if carbon emitters are obliged to remove their own CO2. David
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Download PDF In my work as a quantum engineer, I wear two hats. At the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) in London, where this photo was taken in April, I research quantum metrology, the scientific study of measurements based on quantum-physics principles. The instrument in this image is a dilution refrigerator, which allows us to cool
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NEWS 13 August 2021 Autocorrect errors in Excel still creating genomics headache Despite geneticists being warned about spreadsheet problems, 30% of published papers contain mangled gene names in supplementary data. Dyani Lewis 0 Dyani Lewis Dyani Lewis is a freelance science journalist in Melbourne, Australia. View author publications You can also search for this author
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Download PDF Chesik is on the help desk when the white-haired man comes in with a raggedy-ass server in a shopping cart. “Whatchu got?” Chesik asks. “A dying world.” The man shakes out a faded blue raincoat, dripping water all over the carpet. Chesik hauls the server onto the workbench. He’s seen blades before, even
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CAREER FEATURE 16 August 2021 The hashtags that brought Black scientists together Online communities forged last year sparked collaborations and conversations about diversity and equity in academic research. Virginia Gewin 0 Virginia Gewin Virginia Gewin is a freelance writer in Portland, Oregon. View author publications You can also search for this author in PubMed  Google
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NATURE PODCAST 13 August 2021 Coronapod: COVID boosters amidst global vaccine inequity Should wealthy nations give booster shots when billions remain unvaccinated? Noah Baker & Amy Maxmen Noah Baker View author publications You can also search for this author in PubMed  Google Scholar Amy Maxmen View author publications You can also search for this author
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Seaweed-based inks coloured with mica, a glittery mineral that occurs in many shades. Credit: Andrea Starr/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Materials science 13 August 2021 From drab to dazzling: seaweed yields sparkling coloured inks Cheap, eco-friendly materials can be formed into vibrant 2D or 3D shapes. Share on Twitter Share on Twitter Share on Facebook Share
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Visual effects make the adult black-winged petrel look smaller than the Phillip Island centipede — but the latter is still a good size, at an average length of 19 centimetres. Credit: Luke Halpin (CC BY 4.0) Animal behaviour 13 August 2021 The giant centipede that devours fluffy baby seabirds The voracious Phillip Island centipede eats
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NEWS 12 August 2021 Mammoth’s epic travels preserved in tusk Chemical analysis of an ice age woolly mammoth’s tusk reveals the huge distances it travelled during its lifetime more than 17,000 years ago. Ariana Remmel Ariana Remmel View author publications You can also search for this author in PubMed  Google Scholar Share on Twitter Share
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Data collected during the years OSIRIS-REx of NASA spent buzzing around asteroid Bennu has let researchers update the risk which this potentially hazardous near-Earth object cause. Currently, the spacecraft OSIRIS-REx is on the way to Earth, bearing surface samples gotten from asteroid Bennu. From December 2018 to May this year, the NASA spacecraft analyzed the
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Clouds above temperate forests can help to reduce local temperatures. Credit: Johner Images/Alamy Climate sciences 12 August 2021 Clouds plus trees equals cooler climes at mid-latitudes Planting forests outside the tropics can sequester carbon and counteract global warming. Share on Twitter Share on Twitter Share on Facebook Share on Facebook Share via E-Mail Share via
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NATURE PODCAST 11 August 2021 The brain cells that help animals navigate in 3D Researchers uncover how grid cells fire to help bats navigate, and a fabric that switches between being stiff and flexible. Benjamin Thompson & Nick Petrić Howe Benjamin Thompson View author publications You can also search for this author in PubMed  Google
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A latticework box (model, top left; photograph, bottom left) built by layering 3D-printed ink filaments (middle and right columns). The ink’s properties make it suitable for turning a heat flow into an electric current. Credit: Fredrick Kim et al./Nat. Electron. Energy 11 August 2021 An ink ‘writes’ tiny generators that are powered by heat Printing
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